Tuesday, February 28, 2017
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
MWC 2017: Porsche Design Reveals 2-in-1 with Windows 10
GDC 17: Google Announces New Games For Daydream
Oppo Brings 5X Optical Zoom To Dual-camera Smartphones
Kingston Ships 2TB USB Flash Drive
One-Blue Lowers Blu-ray Licensing Fees
Twitch to Sell Video Games on Streaming Site
Personal Computing Devices Outlook Remains Mildly Negative, Detachable Tablets And Convertible Notebooks See Growth
Gionee Launch New Selfie-focused A1 And A1 Plus Smartphones
Active Discussions
Which of these DVD media are the best, most durable?
How to back up a PS2 DL game
Copy a protected DVD?
roxio issues with xp pro
Help make DVDInfoPro better with dvdinfomantis!!!
menu making
Optiarc AD-7260S review
cdrw trouble
 Home > News > General Computing > IBM Mak...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Wednesday, May 04, 2016
IBM Makes Quantum Computing Available on IBM Cloud


IBM Research is making quantum computing available to members of the public, who can access and run experiments on IBM?s quantum processor.

IBM scientists have built a quantum processor that users can access through a first-of-a-kind quantum computing platform delivered via the IBM Cloud onto any desktop or mobile device. IBM believes quantum computing is the future of computing and has the potential to solve certain problems that are impossible to solve on today's supercomputers.

The cloud-enabled quantum computing platform, called IBM Quantum Experience, will allow users to run algorithms and experiments on IBM's quantum processor, work with the individual quantum bits (qubits), and explore tutorials and simulations around what might be possible with quantum computing.

The quantum processor is composed of five superconducting qubits and is housed at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center in New York.

A universal quantum computer can be programmed to perform any computing task and will be exponentially faster than classical computers for a number of important applications for science and business.

A universal quantum computer does not exist today, but IBM envisions medium-sized quantum processors of 50-100 qubits to be possible in the next decade. With a quantum computer built of just 50 qubits, none of today's TOP500 supercomputers could successfully emulate it, reflecting the tremendous potential of this technology. The community of quantum computer scientists and theorists is working to harness this power, and applications in optimization and chemistry will likely be the first to demonstrate quantum speed-up.

With Moore's Law running out of steam, quantum computing will be among the technologies that could usher in a new era of innovation across industries.

Quantum information is very fragile and needs to be protected from any errors that can result from heat and electromagnetic radiation. Signals are sent in and out of a cryogenic dilution refrigerator to measure operations on the quantum processor.

The IBM team has made a number of engineering advances both at the device level and in the electronic controls to give IBM Quantum Experience users unprecedented and reliably high-quality performance in this five-qubit processor.

The team has built a dynamic user interface on the IBM Cloud platform that allows users to easily connect to the quantum hardware via the cloud. The team sees the introduction to the public of this complete quantum computing framework as just the start of a new user community, which embraces the quantum world and how it works.

In the future, users will have the opportunity to contribute and review their results in the community hosted on the IBM Quantum Experience and IBM scientists will be directly engaged to offer more research and insights on new advances. IBM plans to add more qubits and different processor arrangements to the IBM Quantum Experience over time, so users can expand their experiments and help uncover new applications for the technology.

Quantum computing works fundamentally differently from today?s computers. A classical computer makes use of bits to process information, where each bit represents either a one or a zero. In contrast, a qubit can represent a one, a zero, or both at once, which is known as superposition. This property along with other quantum effects enable quantum computers to perform certain calculations vastly faster than is possible with classical computers.

Most of today?s quantum computing research in academia and industry is focused on building a universal quantum computer. The major challenges include creating qubits of high quality and packaging them together in a scalable way, so they can perform complex calculations in a controllable way.

IBM employs superconducting qubits that are made with superconducting metals on a silicon chip and can be designed and manufactured using standard silicon fabrication techniques.



Previous
Next
AMD Radeon R3 SSDs Released        All News        Apple Loses China Trademark For 'iPhone' On Leather Goods
Google, Fiat Chrysler To Work Together On Self-driving Vehicles     General Computing News      Sony's Future Camera Could Be in The Form Of A Contact Lens

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
IBM tops U.S. Patents list Again , Samsung Follows
TSMC And IBM Detail Their 7nm Progress At 2016 IEDM
IBM and NVIDIA Team Up on New Platform For Deep Learning
New IBM Linux Servers Feature POWER8 Chips And NVIDIA NVLink Interconnect Technology
Scientists Imitate the Functionality of Neurons with a Phase-Change Device
IBM's Strategy Seems To Pay Off, Latest Results Show
AT&T and IBM Team to Bring Internet of Things Capabilities to Developers on IBM Cloud
IBM Scientists Discover New Recycling Process to Convert Old Smartphones and CDs into Non-Toxic Plastics
IBM Watson Will Be Trained To Tackle Cybercrime
IBM and SK Holdings C&C Alliance Brings Watson To South Korea
OpenPOWER Foundation Reveals New Servers
IBM, VMWare, To Accelerate Enterprise Hybrid Cloud Adoption

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2017 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .