Friday, October 31, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Pirate Bay Co-founder Sentenced To 42 Months Imprisonment
SEL Showcases 1058ppi And Foldable OLED Displays
New Outlook for Mac Available Now, Office for Mac Coming In 2015
Updated BBM Offers More Privacy, Control and More
Panasonic Raises Profit Outlook
Toshiba Offers New 4TB and 5TB Desktop HDDs
Samsung Introduces New Ultra Slim Galaxy A5 and Galaxy A3 Smartphones For The Chinese Market
Sharp 2Q Profit Slides
Active Discussions
DVD/DL for Optiarc 7191S at 8X
Copied dvd's say blank in computer only
Made video, won't play back easily
New Features In Firefox 33
updated tests for dvd and cd burners
How to generate lots of different CDs quickly
Yamaha CRW-F1UX
help questions structure DVDR
 Home > News > General Computing > Phase C...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Thursday, February 07, 2008
Phase Change Technology to Challenge Flash Memory


Intel and STMicroelectronics reached a key industry milestone today as they began shipping prototype samples of a future product using a new memory technology called Phase Change Memory (PCM).

The prototypes are the first functional silicon to be delivered to customers for evaluation, bringing the technology one step closer to adoption.

The memory device, codenamed "Alverstone" uses PCM, a new memory technology providing very fast read and write speeds at lower power than conventional flash, and allows for bit alterability normally seen in RAM.

"This is the most significant non-volatile memory advancement in 40 years," said Ed Doller, chief technology officer-designate of Numonyx, the new name for the pending STMicroelectronics and Intel flash memory company. "There have been plenty of attempts to find and develop new non-volatile memory technologies, yet of all the concepts, PCM provides the most compelling solution ? and Intel and STMicroelectronics are delivering PCM into the hands of customers today. This is an important milestone for the industry and for our companies."

In related news, Intel and STMicroelectronics technologists presented a research paper this week at the International Solid States Circuits Conference (ISSCC) describing yet another breakthrough in PCM technology. Together, the companies created the world?s first demonstrable high-density, multi-level cell (MLC) large memory device using PCM technology. The move from single bit per cell to MLC also brings significantly higher density at a lower cost per Mbyte making the combination of MLC and PCM a powerful development.

In 2003, Intel and STMicroelectronics formed a joint development program (JDP) to focus on Phase Change Memory development. Previously the JDP demonstrated 8Mb memory arrays on 180nm at the 2004 VLSI conference and first disclosed the Alverstone 90nm 128Mbit memory device at the 2006 VLSI Symposium. Alverstone and future JDP products will become part of Numonyx, a new independent semiconductor company created through an agreement between STMicroelectronics, Intel and Francisco Partners signed in May 2007. The new company's strategic focus will be on supplying complete memory solutions for a variety of consumer and industrial devices, including cellular phones, MP3 players, digital cameras, computers and other high-tech equipment. The companies are scheduled to close the transaction in the first quarter of 2008.

In 2007, the combined memory market for DRAM, flash, and other memory products such as EEPROM was US$61 billion, according to the industry research firm Web-Feet Research, Inc. Memory technology cost declines have traditionally been driven at the rate of "Moore?s Law," where density doubles every 18 months with each lithography shrink. As RAM and flash technologies run into scaling limitations over the next decade, PCM costs will decline at a faster rate. The advent of multi-level-cell PCM will further accelerate the cost per bit crossover of PCM technology relative to today's technologies. Finally, by combining the bit-alterability of DRAM, the non-volatility of flash, the fast reads of NOR and the fast writes of NAND, PCM has the ability to address the entire memory market and be a key driver for future growth over the next decade.

Alverstone is a 128Mb device built on 90nm and is intended to allow memory customers to evaluate PCM features, allowing cellular and embedded customers to learn more about PCM and how it can be incorporated into their future system designs.


Previous
Next
Toshiba to Develop 16-Gigabit NAND Flash Memory with 43nm Process Technology        All News        How to Copy a Blu-ray Disc to the Hard Drive
Toshiba to Develop 16-Gigabit NAND Flash Memory with 43nm Process Technology     General Computing News      Microsoft Showcases Web Advertising Prototypes

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Intel To Work With AT&T To Research Software Defined Networking
Intel Meegopad T01 Is A Bay Trail PC On HDMI Stick
The Intel Experience Coming In Best Buy Stores
New Data Protection Tecnology Protects Point-of-sale Data
Intel Reports Record Third-Quarter Revenue
Intel Releases Internet of Things Developer Kit
Intel and Mitsubishi Electric Collaborate to Create Factory Automation Systems
Intel To Invest in Semiconductor Business under Tsinghua Unigroup
Latest Intel LTE Chipset Certified on China Mobile
Intel Offers Developers Software Tools, Outlines PC Evolution Across New Form Factors
Intel Unveils New Developer Tools, Future Technologies Tablets, Analytics, Wearable Devices and PCs at IDF 2014
New Intel Xeon E5-2600 v3 Processors Released

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .