Tuesday, February 28, 2017
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Samsung Group Disbands Its Future Strategy Office
Pioneer BDR-XD06J-UHD Is The First Portable UHD BD PC Drive
MWC 2017: Porsche Design Reveals 2-in-1 with Windows 10
GDC 17: Google Announces New Games For Daydream
Oppo Brings 5X Optical Zoom To Dual-camera Smartphones
Kingston Ships 2TB USB Flash Drive
One-Blue Lowers Blu-ray Licensing Fees
Twitch to Sell Video Games on Streaming Site
Active Discussions
Which of these DVD media are the best, most durable?
How to back up a PS2 DL game
Copy a protected DVD?
roxio issues with xp pro
Help make DVDInfoPro better with dvdinfomantis!!!
menu making
Optiarc AD-7260S review
cdrw trouble
 Home > News > General Computing > Google ...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Tuesday, November 29, 2016
Google Detects Diabetic Eye Disease With Machine Learning


Diabetic retinopathy - an eye condition that affects people with diabetes - is the fastest growing cause of blindness, and it can be treated if detected early. Google's deep learning algorithm is capable of interpreting signs of DR in retinal photographs.



One of the most common ways to detect diabetic eye disease is to have a specialist examine pictures of the back of the eye and determine whether there are signs of the disease, and if so, how severe it is. While annual screening is recommended for all patients with diabetes, many people live in areas without easy access to specialist care. That means millions of people aren't getting the care they need to prevent loss of vision.

Today, in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Google published a deep learning algorithm capable of interpreting signs of DR in retinal photographs, potentially helping doctors screen more patients, especially in underserved communities with limited resources.

Working with a team of doctors in India and the U.S., Google's team created a dataset of 128,000 images and used them to train a deep neural network to detect diabetic retinopathy. The researchres then compared their algorithm's performance to another set of images examined by a panel of board-certified ophthalmologists. Google says its algorithm performs on par with the ophthalmologists, achieving both high sensitivity and specificity.

There?s a lot more to do before an algorithm like this can be used widely. For example, interpretation of a 2D retinal photograph is only one step in the process of diagnosing diabetic eye disease - in some cases, doctors use a 3D imaging technology to examine various layers of a retina in detail. Google's colleagues at DeepMind are working on applying machine learning to that method. In the future, these two complementary methods might be used together to assist doctors in the diagnosis of a wide spectrum of eye diseases.



Previous
Next
Facebook Brings Games To Messenger        All News        Nintendo To Work With Universal To Create Highly Themed Parks In Japan The The U.S.
Intel Teams Up With Delphi and Mobileye for Self-Driving Cars     General Computing News      Imagination And DENSO Are Teaming Up On Automotive

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Google Assistant is Coming to More Android Phones
Google AI Tools Lets You Identify Malicious Comments on Your Website's Articles
Google Dominates VR Headset Shipments But Samsung Gets The VR Revenues
Google Investigated Over Alleged Practices Against Samsung's Tizen OS
EU Says Google Cloud Commitments Are Compliant With Rules For International Data Flows
Facebook, Google, Others Unite Against Fake News in France
Google Ordered To Allow Access To Foreign Emails
Alphabet Earnings Surge on Mobile And YouTube
Google Maps To Find You A Parking Spot
Google Removed 1.7 billion Bad Ads In 2016
Updated Google App For Android Will Save Results If Your Connection Is Bad
Google Assistant Coming on Android TVs

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2017 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .